WORLD


Japan marks 77 years since end of World War Two

Baku, August 15, AZERTAC

People in Japan are marking 77 years since the end of World War Two, according to NHK World–Japan.

On August 15, 1945, people gathered around their radios to hear a message from the Emperor. He announced that Japan had surrendered. Millions of Japanese people died in the war. On Monday, the government held a ceremony to remember them.

About 1,000 people attended the annual event in Tokyo. The number of attendees this year was reduced as a coronavirus measure.

The country observed a moment of silence at the stroke of noon to honor people who were killed in the war.

Over 2 million were related to the Imperial Japanese military and about 800,000 were civilians.

Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako took part in the memorial event.

Emperor Naruhito said, "Looking back on the long period of post-war peace, reflecting on our past and bearing in mind the feelings of deep remorse, I earnestly hope that the ravages of war will never again be repeated. Together with all our people, I now pay my heartfelt tribute to all those who lost their lives in the war, both on the battlefields and elsewhere, and pray for world peace and for the continuing developments of our country."

Prime Minister Kishida Fumio also delivered a speech, saying Japan is committed to building peace and prosperity.

He said, "Conflicts are still a constant in this world, but our nation will, under the banner of proactive contribution to peace, work committedly with the global community to solve the various challenges that the world is facing."

More than three quarters of the relatives of the war dead who attended Monday's ceremony are over the age of 70.

Events to remember the lives lost in the war and to reflect on peace are being held throughout the day, across Japan.

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