CULTURE


Master of Azerbaijan`s fine art

Baku, April 11, AZERTAC

People’s Artist Azim Azimzade was born April 30, 1880 in Novkhani village near Baku.

The most fruitful period of Azim's creative activity took place during the 1930s when he dedicated his works to the old Azerbaijani traditions and customs. Well-known works during this period include "Ram Fight," "Kos-Kosa.” He also worked on a series called "Old Baku".

Azim Azimzade was a master of the satirical drawing and he made a deep impression on the development of Azerbaijani graphics, enriching the tradition with a huge variety of images and styles.

In his attempt to expose the inequalities of the society, he often developed contrastive scenes comparing wealth with poverty, as well as attitudes towards men and women. For example, he drew "Wealthy Wedding" and "Poor Wedding" (1931).

Many of his paintings expose the harsh conditions imposed on women. Works like "The Girl Married Off Against Her Will," "Husband Beating His Wife," (1937) and "Difficult Labor" show the hardships that women faced.

Some of Azim's drawings are signed with the initials "AA".

Azim's first personal exhibition was organized in Baku in 1940 and included 1,200 works, representing 35 years of creative activity.

Azim had five children. He was especially fond of his son Latif (1924-1943), who became an oil engineer. Latif was called up to serve in World War II. His last letter home was dated February 1943. Azim was devastated when he received the news of his death and never recovered. He died of a heart attack on June 15, 1943, exactly four months later.

Since then, Baku's Art School, which Azimzade had directed from 1928-1938, was named after him. Most of Azerbaijan's greatest artists have received master classes in this educational institution.

 

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